Art, Design, and Technology and HR Bill 5547

Over 90% of business leaders claim they cannot find the creative talent they are
seeking to hire. A 2010 IBM survey of 1,500 CEOs from 60 countries and 33 industries worldwide revealed that creativity — more than rigor, management discipline, integrity or even vision — is the most essential leadership skill in an increasingly complex and interconnected world. Stanford University Business School professor Steve Blank says the practice of entrepreneurship is better aligned with an arts curriculum than a traditional business school curriculum. Entrepreneurship requires imagination, collaboration, risk, taking and resilience, the very skills taught through artistic practice.

Research shows that children who study the Arts are four times more likely to be
recognized for academic achievement (and consistently score higher on standard
exams such as the SAT), three times more likely elected to class office, four times more likely to participate in math and science fairs, and three times more likely to win an award for school attendance.

Yet, with both of these realities… Arts Education makes up less than 7% of school programs due to cuts in funding.

Perhaps the tide is turning.

The House Education Committee approved unanimously an amendment to expand. HR Bill 5547 to include new, explicit support for integrating arts and design skills training into CTE ( career and technical education) programs, permitting states and school districts to support CTE programs that integrate arts and design skills. This amendment will go to the full house for a vote.

In supporting the amendment, Rep. Bonamici said, “America’s economic success has also been built on our propensity for innovation, inventiveness, and entrepreneurship. Education programs that integrate arts and design elements nurture future workers to think in new ways.”

____

From Pre-K to Higher Ed, the arts are need to be integrated into curriculum.
To learn more visit Americans for the Arts.